Scientific Research

Botanical research firm to relocate HQ to Baltimore, bringing 200 jobs

baltimoresun.com

Botanical research firm to relocate HQ to Baltimore, bringing 200 jobs

- Vitreon America Inc. will move its headquarters to Baltimore City from Northern Virginia, bringing 200 full-time jobs over five years and opening a 200,000-square-foot high-tech laboratory, company and state officials announced Monday. The botanical research company will move to Wicomico Street in South Baltimore to be closer to Maryland's medical and scientific research institutions, including a research-oriented greenhouse at Morgan State University, officials said

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Tags: Scientific Research | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  South |  Atlantic |  Maryland |  Baltimore | 

Chicago Tribune: Safeguard science from Trump

madison.com

Chicago Tribune: Safeguard science from Trump

- For decades, Chicago has had a backyard view of science at its most sublime. At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, physicists hone our understanding of the universe by trailblazing the frontier of the subatomic. At Argonne National Laboratory, scientists probe ways to make lighter, cheaper batteries for electric cars and smartphones, and tackle global water scarcity with membranes fine enough to filter out viruses and nanoscale pollutants

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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  Midwest |  East |  Illinois |  Wisconsin |  North |  Chicago |  Cook |  Chicago Metro | 

Research team set to begin largest breast cancer clinical trial in Oklahoma

kfor.com

Research team set to begin largest breast cancer clinical trial in Oklahoma

- NORMAN, Okla. — A University of Oklahoma and Mercy Hospital research team is set to begin the largest breast cancer clinical trial ever performed in Oklahoma. The team has developed new breast cancer risk prediction models to identify patients who might have cancers that are not visible on mammograms. The team has reviewed 2,000 imaging studies performed at Mercy over the past two years and has refined the image analysis system

Categories: Science & Nature |  Health | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  South |  Southcentral US |  Oklahoma | 

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

siouxcityjournal.com

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

- ALLAN, Jordan (AP) — A top-notch research center that brought together Iran, Israel and other Mideast antagonists is launching operations this fall in hopes of boosting scientific discovery with the help of a powerful microscope and opening a window to a better future for a region beset by war, boycotts and closed borders. It's been a tough journey since groundbreaking in 2003, marked by political rows and the 2010 assassination of an Iranian scientist linked to the project

Categories: Education |  Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  Mideast |  Asia |  Iran |  S. Asia | 

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

richmond.com

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

- ALLAN, Jordan (AP) — A top-notch research center that brought together Iran, Israel and other Mideast antagonists is launching operations this fall in hopes of boosting scientific discovery with the help of a powerful microscope and opening a window to a better future for a region beset by war, boycotts and closed borders. It's been a tough journey since groundbreaking in 2003, marked by political rows and the 2010 assassination of an Iranian scientist linked to the project

Categories: Education |  Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  Mideast |  Asia |  Iran |  S. Asia | 

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

abcnews.com

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

- A top-notch research center that brought together Iran, Israel and other Mideast antagonists is launching operations this fall in hopes of boosting scientific discovery with the help of a powerful microscope and opening a window to a better future for a region beset by war, boycotts and closed borders. It's been a tough journey since groundbreaking in 2003, marked by political rows and the 2010 assassination of an Iranian scientist linked to the project

Categories: Education |  Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  Mideast |  Asia |  Iran |  S. Asia | 

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

seattletimes.com

Despite conflicts, Mideast research center to launch in fall

- ALLAN, Jordan (AP) — A top-notch research center that brought together Iran, Israel and other Mideast antagonists is launching operations this fall in hopes of boosting scientific discovery with the help of a powerful microscope and opening a window to a better future for a region beset by war, boycotts and closed borders. It’s been a tough journey since groundbreaking in 2003, marked by political rows and the 2010 assassination of an Iranian scientist linked to the project

Categories: Education |  Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  North America |  Americas |  Mideast |  Asia |  Washington |  Pacific |  West |  Iran |  S. Asia | 

Oregon leaders ask state to invest in research complex

katu.com

Oregon leaders ask state to invest in research complex

- EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — The mayor of the city of Eugene and Lane County Commissioner Sid Leiken are urging state lawmakers to approve $100 million in immediate financing for a proposed University of Oregon scientific research facility. Mayor Lucy Vinis and University of Oregon President Michael Schill went to Salem this week to ask state lawmakers to finance part of the complex before the end of the legislative session, The Register-Guard reported

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Tags: Scientific Research | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  Midwest |  East |  Illinois |  North |  West |  Ogle |  Oregon | 

Fentanyl-related deaths spiking in R.I., studies say

providencejournal.com

Fentanyl-related deaths spiking in R.I., studies say

- Two new research studies published this month in the International Journal of Drug Policy offer fresh evidence of how the powerful synthetic opioid has infected the drug supply in Rhode Island. Lynn Arditi Journal staff writer lynnarditi PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Two new research studies published this month in the International Journal of Drug Policy offer fresh evidence of how the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl has infected the drug supply in Rhode Island

Categories: Science & Nature |  Education | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  Northeast |  New England |  Rhode Island | 

If there was ever life on Mars, Gale Crater could have hosted a variety of microbes, study says

latimes.com

If there was ever life on Mars, Gale Crater could have hosted a variety of microbes, study says

- Scientists with NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover mission have found that Gale Crater had the right physical and chemical conditions for life for 700 million years — and for part of that history, held a lake that could have hosted a wide variety of microbial life. The findings, published last week in the journal Science, document a long-lasting Martian environment that had the potential to host a wide variety of living things

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: United States | 

USU plays key role in successful launch of satellite from space station

deseretnews.com

USU plays key role in successful launch of satellite from space station

- LOGAN — When a small defense satellite was launched from the International Space Station last week, a team from Utah State University's Space Dynamics Laboratory gathered to watch the deployment. The launch was the culmination of some two years of work for the small team that collaborated with the Air Force Research Laboratory to develop the Satellite for High Accuracy Radar Calibration, or SHARC for short

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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  West |  Mountain |  Utah | 

Agency takes tectonics study to earthquake-prone Alaska

koat.com

Agency takes tectonics study to earthquake-prone Alaska

- ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska averages 40,000 earthquakes per year, with more large quakes than the other 49 states combined, and America’s shakiest state is about to have its ground examined like never before. A federal agency that supports basic science research is completing installation in Alaska of an array of seismometers as part of its quest to map the Earth’s upper crust beneath North America

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: North America |  United States |  West |  Mountain |  New Mexico |  Pacific |  Alaska |  Anchorage | 

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

wlwt.com

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

- (CNN) — Beneath its heavy cloud cover, Jupiter has been able to keep its secrets from astronomers. Now, first results from NASA's Juno mission are challenging researchers' beliefs about the gas giant. The results were revealed during a media teleconference Thursday with NASA researchers and published in corresponding studies through the journal Science and Geophysical Research Letters. Juno launched in August 2011 but didn't arrive at Jupiter until July

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

ketv.com

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

- (CNN) — Beneath its heavy cloud cover, Jupiter has been able to keep its secrets from astronomers. Now, first results from NASA's Juno mission are challenging researchers' beliefs about the gas giant. The results were revealed during a media teleconference Thursday with NASA researchers and published in corresponding studies through the journal Science and Geophysical Research Letters. Juno launched in August 2011 but didn't arrive at Jupiter until July

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

kcci.com

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

- (CNN) — Beneath its heavy cloud cover, Jupiter has been able to keep its secrets from astronomers. Now, first results from NASA's Juno mission are challenging researchers' beliefs about the gas giant. The results were revealed during a media teleconference Thursday with NASA researchers and published in corresponding studies through the journal Science and Geophysical Research Letters. Juno launched in August 2011 but didn't arrive at Jupiter until July

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

wvtm13.com

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission

- (CNN) — Beneath its heavy cloud cover, Jupiter has been able to keep its secrets from astronomers. Now, first results from NASA's Juno mission are challenging researchers' beliefs about the gas giant. The results were revealed during a media teleconference Thursday with NASA researchers and published in corresponding studies through the journal Science and Geophysical Research Letters. Juno launched in August 2011 but didn't arrive at Jupiter until July

Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 

Latest Stories

Local Science Teachers Get A Lesson At Jackson Laboratory
Local Science Teachers Get A Lesson At Jackson Laboratory The Jackson Laboratory on Monday kicked off weeklong trainings and lab sessions to bring high school science teachers up to speed on rapidly changing gene research. The Farmington research center brought together more than a dozen teachers from Connecticut and Massachusetts. The focus in the "Teaching the Genome Generation" program is on bioinformatics, the science of collecting and analyzing biological data such as genetic codes, and ethics related to the gathering and use of personal genetic and health information   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature |  Education | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  Northeast |  New England |  Connecticut |  Hartford |  Farmington | 
Botanical research firm to relocate HQ to Baltimore, bringing 200 jobs
Botanical research firm to relocate HQ to Baltimore, bringing 200 jobs Vitreon America Inc. will move its headquarters to Baltimore City from Northern Virginia, bringing 200 full-time jobs over five years and opening a 200,000-square-foot high-tech laboratory, company and state officials announced Monday. The botanical research company will move to Wicomico Street in South Baltimore to be closer to Maryland's medical and scientific research institutions, including a research-oriented greenhouse at Morgan State University, officials said   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Tags: Scientific Research | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  South |  Atlantic |  Maryland |  Baltimore | 
Aviagen revolutionizes genomics testing for both chicken and turkey breeds with state-of-the art laboratory
Aviagen® is pleased to announce the opening of a new state-of-the-art Genomics laboratory. Based in Scotland, the new laboratory is equipped to process well over a million DNA samples and genotypes yearly for both chicken and turkey lines. This volume represents an unprecedented scale in Genomics throughput, not only in poultry but also across livestock species. New laboratory broadens the field for Genomics selection   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Birds' flight ability could determine shape of their eggs: study
Scientists may have solved the mystery of why bird eggs come in an astonishing variety of shapes, like ellipses in hummingbirds, spheres in owls and pointy ovoids in shorebirds. According to a new study published Thursday in the U.S. journal Science, it's related to birds' flight ability and the egg membrane may play a critical role in determining shape. "In contrast to classic hypotheses, we discovered that flight may influence egg shape," lead author Mary Caswell Stoddard of Princeton University said in a statement   Read More ...
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Places: United States |  China | 
Track batteries degrading in real time
Track batteries degrading in real time Justin Sullivan/Getty. Energy storage is the main bottleneck for clean electricity, transport and portable electronics. Electrochemical devices such as lithium-ion batteries are most promising. These hold and release energy through reversible reactions in their electrodes. They are compact, safe and efficient — ideal for electric vehicles. Improved lithium-ion batteries have extended the mileage of electric cars from about 150 kilometres in 2012 to more than 500 km today, for Tesla's Model S 100D   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage
Cpf1 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that is emerging as a powerful genome-editing tool. Here we provide insight into its DNA-targeting mechanism by determining the structure of Francisella novicida Cpf1 with the triple-stranded R-loop generated after DNA cleavage. The structure reveals the machinery involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)–DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain   Read More ...
Categories: Sports | 
Tags: Swimming | 
Places: United States |  North America |  Americas |  Idaho |  Mountain |  West | 
Protect funding for US earthquake early-warning system
Protect funding for US earthquake early-warning system On a winter night three centuries ago, so a Native American legend tells, the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada was rocked by a ferocious clash between supernatural creatures. The Thunderbird and the Whale battled for hours. Thunderbird went to grab Whale in his talons, but Whale got away. The ground shook and the ocean rose to flood the coast   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: North America |  United States | 
Ecology: Document India's floral biodiversity
This month's bicentenary of the birth of Joseph Dalton Hooker, one of the great botanical explorers of the nineteenth century, is a good time to highlight the urgent need to document India's remarkable biodiversity for conservation purposes (see a. Hooker's compilation, The Flora of British India (1872–97), was the first, and is still the most authoritative, account of flowering plants in the country, which at that time included present-day Pakistan, Bangladesh and parts of Myanmar   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States |  Asia |  S. Asia |  India | 
Don’t let Europe’s open-science dream drift
Don’t let Europe’s open-science dream drift The European Commission has its critics, but no one can doubt it has ambitious plans. For example, by the year 2020, the commission says, all European researchers will be able to log in to an enormous virtual repository that will eventually provide access to the collective data from all publicly funded research. This European Open Science Cloud would be a safe, cheap and reliable way to store and access data, and getting to it would be as easy as signing into a Netflix account   Read More ...
Categories: Motoring | 
Tags: Car Reviews |  Cars |  Peugeot |  Vehicle Manufacturers | 
Places: Russia |  E. Europe |  Europe | 
Improved maize reference genome with single-molecule technologies
a, Size distribution of single molecules for the optical maps. A total of 150 Gb (~60-fold coverage) of single-molecule raw data from BioNano chips was collected for map construction. The N50 of the single molecules was ~261 kb, and the label density was 11.6 per 100 kb. After assembly, the total size of the map reached 2.12 Gb with an N50 of 2.47 Mb. b, Length distribution of SMRT sequencing reads   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Histone deacetylase 3 prepares brown adipose tissue for acute thermogenic challenge
Brown adipose tissue is a thermogenic organ that dissipates chemical energy as heat to protect animals against hypothermia and to counteract metabolic disease. However, the transcriptional mechanisms that determine the thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue before environmental cold are unknown. Here we show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is required to activate brown adipose tissue enhancers to ensure thermogenic aptitude   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Sustainability: A greener culture
Sustainability: A greener culture In July 2015, Stephanie and Fraser Januchowski-Hartley left their home in Totnes, UK, and headed for the International Congress for Conservation Biology in Montpellier, France. Instead of catching a flight, they boarded a boat and then made their way across France by bicycle and train, pedalling more than 600 kilometres over 5 days. After the conference, they took a train home   Read More ...
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Places: United States | 
Consent: Data-sharing for indigenous peoples
Broad-consent models for human studies, which leave decisions on data-sharing to the researchers, may not be appropriate for work with indigenous peoples. Making the sharing of data almost impossible is also problematic. Everyone stands to benefit from responsible data-sharing innovations that can be applied more widely. The largest volume of genomic data amassed so far from Aboriginal Australians is deposited in the European Genome–phenome Archive ()   Read More ...
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Places: United States | 
Multilineage communication regulates human liver bud development from pluripotency
Conventional two-dimensional differentiation from pluripotency fails to recapitulate cell interactions occurring during organogenesis. Three-dimensional organoids generate complex organ-like tissues; however, it is unclear how heterotypic interactions affect lineage identity. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing to reconstruct hepatocyte-like lineage progression from pluripotency in two-dimensional culture. We then derive three-dimensional liver bud organoids by reconstituting hepatic, stromal, and endothelial interactions, and deconstruct heterogeneity during liver bud development   Read More ...
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Women in science: Finding consensus
US female deans, provosts and other academic administrators gave higher ratings than did their male counterparts to policies and strategies aimed at improving the professional lives of women in science, a study finds (). And they disagreed with male administrators about the value of some strategies for retaining female faculty members in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). US universities have considered dozens of ways to bolster the number of women in senior academic posts, yet women hold less than 20% of combined tenured and tenure-track posts in such fields as physics, chemistry and computer science, notes the study, published in Frontiers in Psychology   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Microglia-dependent synapse loss in type I interferon-mediated lupus
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an incurable autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody deposition in tissues such as kidney, skin and lungs. Notably, up to 75% of patients with SLE experience neuropsychiatric symptoms that range from anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment to seizures and, in rare cases, psychosis—collectively this is referred to as central nervous system (CNS) lupus. In some cases, certain autoantibodies, such as anti-NMDAR or anti-phospholipid antibodies, promote CNS lupus   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
BAP1 regulates IP3R3-mediated Ca2+ flux to mitochondria suppressing cell transformation
BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a potent tumour suppressor gene that modulates environmental carcinogenesis. All carriers of inherited heterozygous germline BAP1-inactivating mutations (BAP1+/−) developed one and often several BAP1−/− malignancies in their lifetime, mostly malignant mesothelioma, uveal melanoma, and so on. Moreover, BAP1-acquired biallelic mutations are frequent in human cancers. BAP1 tumour suppressor activity has been attributed to its nuclear localization, where it helps to maintain genome integrity   Read More ...
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Microscopy of the interacting Harper–Hofstadter model in the two-body limit
The interplay between magnetic fields and interacting particles can lead to exotic phases of matter that exhibit topological order and high degrees of spatial entanglement. Although these phases were discovered in a solid-state setting, recent innovations in systems of ultracold neutral atoms—uncharged atoms that do not naturally experience a Lorentz force—allow the synthesis of artificial magnetic, or gauge, fields. This experimental platform holds promise for exploring exotic physics in fractional quantum Hall systems, owing to the microscopic control and precision that is achievable in cold-atom systems   Read More ...
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Places: United States | 
Heatwaves to soar above the hot air of climate politics
Heatwaves to soar above the hot air of climate politics Scott Pruitt achieved something of a political first last week. The controversial head of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was grilled by the officials who control his budget and told that he had asked for too little cash. In fact, the officials insisted, they were determined to give his agency more than he had requested. “I can assure you, you’re going to be the first EPA administrator that’s come before this committee in eight years that actually gets more money than they asked for,” said Oklahoma congressman Tom Cole, a member of the US House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations who, as a Republican, is nominally on the same side as Pruitt   Read More ...
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A giant planet undergoing extreme-ultraviolet irradiation by its hot massive-star host
The amount of ultraviolet irradiation and ablation experienced by a planet depends strongly on the temperature of its host star. Of the thousands of extrasolar planets now known, only six have been found that transit hot, A-type stars (with temperatures of 7,300–10,000 kelvin), and no planets are known to transit the even hotter B-type stars. For example, WASP-33 is an A-type star with a temperature of about 7,430 kelvin, which hosts the hottest known transiting planet, WASP-33b (ref   Read More ...
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Study sheds light on how bacterial organelles assemble
Study sheds light on how bacterial organelles assemble Scientists are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. The work, led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Michigan State University (MSU), will appear in the June 23 issue of the journal Science. They studied the organelle shell of an ocean-dwelling slime bacteria called Haliangium ochraceum   Read More ...
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Can the U.S. Grid Work With 100% Renewables? There's a Scientific Fight Brewing
Can the U.S. Grid Work With 100% Renewables? There's a Scientific Fight Brewing A battle royale between competing visions for the future of energy blew open today on the pages of a venerable science journal. The conflict pits 21 climate and power system experts against Stanford University civil and environmental engineer Mark Jacobson and his vision of a world fuelled 100 percent by renewable solar, wind, and hydroelectric energy. The criticism of his “wind, water and sun” solution and an unapologetic rebuttal from Jacobson and three Stanford colleagues appear today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)   Read More ...
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Places: United States | 
An ancient lake on Mars could have supported a variety of microbial life
An ancient lake on Mars could have supported a variety of microbial life Scientists with NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover mission have found that Gale Crater had the right physical and chemical conditions for life for 700 million years — and for part of that history, held a lake that could have hosted a wide variety of microbial life. The findings, published last week in the journal Science, document a long-lasting Martian environment that had the potential to host a diverse array of living things   Read More ...
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Places: United States |  North America |  Americas | 
Reassess dam building in the Amazon
Reassess dam building in the Amazon Taylor Weidman/LightRocket via Getty. The sheer size of the Amazon and its tributaries is beguiling. The basin spans 6.1 million square kilometres from the Atlantic Ocean to the Andes mountains, discharging 17% of the world’s fresh water. It’s a tempting resource, but a push by Brazil and its neighbours to build hundreds of dams in the region could irrevocably alter one of Earth’s most precious landscapes   Read More ...
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Places: United States | 
Tissue engineering: NIH competition to create 'eye in a dish'
The National Eye Institute of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched a competition to develop a working model of the human retina from stem cells — namely, the 3-D Retina Organoid Challenge (see This will help to clarify the mechanisms of retinal disease, stimulate new technologies and develop more effective therapies (see a. There are other promising examples of NIH-funded 3D human-tissue models   Read More ...
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Rare cell variability and drug-induced reprogramming as a mode of cancer drug resistance
Therapies that target signalling molecules that are mutated in cancers can often have substantial short-term effects, but the emergence of resistant cancer cells is a major barrier to full cures. Resistance can result from secondary mutations, but in other cases there is no clear genetic cause, raising the possibility of non-genetic rare cell variability. Here we show that human melanoma cells can display profound transcriptional variability at the single-cell level that predicts which cells will ultimately resist drug treatment   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature |  Health | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Harmonize conflicting regulations for genetically engineered plants and animals
Harmonize conflicting regulations for genetically engineered plants and animals In January this year, two US agencies proposed the first substantial overhaul in 30 years of how they regulate genetically altered crops and livestock. Some plant scientists expressed relief. Some animal researchers used more colourful language. The proposals — one to govern plants, the other to govern animals — came to wildly different conclusions. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) suggests that many plants whose genomes have been altered by a single DNA letter change should not need approval before being released in the field   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Genomic epidemiology reveals multiple introductions of Zika virus into the United States
Zika virus (ZIKV) is causing an unprecedented epidemic linked to severe congenital abnormalities. In July 2016, mosquito-borne ZIKV transmission was reported in the continental United States; since then, hundreds of locally acquired infections have been reported in Florida. To gain insights into the timing, source, and likely route(s) of ZIKV introduction, we tracked the virus from its first detection in Florida by sequencing ZIKV genomes from infected patients and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature |  Health | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Publishing: Journals could share peer-review data
Before dispensing with peer review in favour of open science, responsible scientists need to do everything they can to improve this centuries-old system. Our experience shows that journals that share information on all aspects of the peer-review process can foster transparency and accountability in publishing, while protecting the interests of authors, reviewers, editors and researchers. This systematic investigation of the review process will enable more journals to recognize biases against the publication of innovative research, to test different peer-review models and to work out how best to engage and reward reviewers   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Conservation: Pay countries to stop whaling
We raise the possibility that countries opposed to whaling could stop other nations that continue the practice simply by paying them compensation. This idea is inspired by a survey we conducted in February 2016 in Australia and Japan. We found that the maximum amount Australians would be willing to pay to discourage Japan's whaling programme was Aus31.4 (US23.6) per year per household   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Oceania |  Australasia |  Australia |  United States | 
Salary negotiation: Get what you seek
Salary negotiation: Get what you seek A move into industry after a PhD may not bring immediate financial rewards, but it pays to know your strengths. Andy McLachlan had always intended for his PhD in chemistry to lead to a job in industry. His research at the University of Manchester, UK, had been funded by a pharmaceutical firm, and focused on using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to analyse the components in mixtures after chemical reactions   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Junior scientists: Senior scientists as allies for equity
Asking the scientific system to fix itself from the bottom up could place an unacceptable burden on junior scientists (see ). Moreover, their efforts are likely to make little difference without the participation of senior colleagues. Young researchers, especially women and those from ethnic minorities, are already forced to challenge the existing culture if they are to advance professionally. They face overt and unconscious bias, barriers to recruitment and unequal pay   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Slush-like polar structures in single-crystal relaxors
Despite more than 50 years of investigation, it is still unclear how the underlying structure of relaxor ferroelectrics gives rise to their defining properties, such as ultrahigh piezoelectric coefficients, high permittivity over a broad temperature range, diffuse phase transitions, strong frequency dependence in dielectric response, and phonon anomalies. The model of polar nanoregions inside a non-polar matrix has been widely used to describe the structure of relaxor ferroelectrics   Read More ...
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Places: Americas |  North America |  United States | 
Corrigendum: MC4R-dependent suppression of appetite by bone-derived lipocalin 2
Nature 546, 7658 (2017). doi:10.1038/nature22808 Author: Ioanna Mosialou, Steven Shikhel, Jian-Min Liu, Antonio Maurizi, Na Luo, Zhenyan He, Yiru Huang, Haihong Zong, Richard A. Friedman, Jonathan Barasch, Patricia Lanzano, Liyong Deng, Rudolph L. Leibel, Mishaela Rubin, Thomas Nickolas, Wendy Chung, Lori M. Zeltser, Kevin W. Williams, Jeffrey E. Pessin & Stavroula Kousteni. Nature543, 385–390 (2017); doi:10.1038/nature21697In this Article, the surname of author Thomas Nickolas was misspelled ‘Nicholas’   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: United States | 
Structural basis of CRISPR–SpyCas9 inhibition by an anti-CRISPR protein
CRISPR–Cas9 systems are bacterial adaptive immune systems that defend against infection by phages. Through the RNA-guided endonuclease activity of Cas9 they degrade double-stranded DNA with a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and sequences complementary to the guide RNA. Recently, two anti-CRISPR proteins (AcrIIA2 and AcrIIA4 from Listeria monocytogenes prophages) were identified, both of which inhibit Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpyCas9) and L. monocytogenes Cas9 activity in bacteria and human cells   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
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Stability and function of regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet
Adaptive immune responses are tailored to different types of pathogens through differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into functionally distinct subsets of effector T cells (T helper 1 (TH1), TH2, and TH17) defined by expression of the key transcription factors T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt, respectively. Regulatory T (Treg) cells comprise a distinct anti-inflammatory lineage specified by the X-linked transcription factor Foxp3 (refs 2, 3)   Read More ...
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Fight the silencing of gun research
Fight the silencing of gun research In the half-century since the assassination of Martin Luther King, more civilians in the United States have been killed with guns than American soldiers have died in all US wars since the nation was founded in 1776. Currently, on an average day, about 300 Americans are shot and 100 die from gunshot wounds — in murders, attempted suicides or accidents (see )   Read More ...
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Empty rhetoric over data sharing slows science
Empty rhetoric over data sharing slows science Everyone agrees that there are good reasons for having open data. It speeds research, allowing others to build promptly on results. It improves replicability. It enables scientists to test whether claims in a paper truly reflect the whole data set. It helps them to find incorrect data. And it improves the attribution of credit to the data’s originators. But who will pay? And who will host? But in too many cases, government agencies lack the funds to build platforms for data sharing and resist taking responsibility for such infrastructure   Read More ...
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Robust wireless power transfer using a nonlinear parity–time-symmetric circuit
Considerable progress in wireless power transfer has been made in the realm of non-radiative transfer, which employs magnetic-field coupling in the near field. A combination of circuit resonance and impedance transformation is often used to help to achieve efficient transfer of power over a predetermined distance of about the size of the resonators. The development of non-radiative wireless power transfer has paved the way towards real-world applications such as wireless powering of implantable medical devices and wireless charging of stationary electric vehicles   Read More ...
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A wet-tolerant adhesive patch inspired by protuberances in suction cups of octopi
Adhesion strategies that rely on mechanical interlocking or molecular attractions between surfaces can suffer when coming into contact with liquids. Thus far, artificial wet and dry adhesives have included hierarchical mushroom-shaped or porous structures that allow suction or capillarity, supramolecular structures comprising nanoparticles, and chemistry-based attractants that use various protein polyelectrolytes. However, it is challenging to develop adhesives that are simple to make and also perform well—and repeatedly—under both wet and dry conditions, while avoiding non-chemical contamination on the adhered surfaces   Read More ...
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