Antarctica

Another Climate-Change Nightmare: 91 New Volcanoes Under Antarctica's Ice

ndtv.com

Another Climate-Change Nightmare: 91 New Volcanoes Under Antarctica's Ice


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Would You Dare to Eat This 106-Year Old Fruitcake from Antarctica?

smartcooky.com

Would You Dare to Eat This 106-Year Old Fruitcake from Antarctica?


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106-year-old fruitcake found in ‘excellent condition’ in Antarctica

todayonline.com

106-year-old fruitcake found in ‘excellent condition’ in Antarctica


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Would you take a bite? Edible 100-year-old fruitcake discovered in Antarctica

independent.ie

Would you take a bite? Edible 100-year-old fruitcake discovered in Antarctica


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A huge iceberg breaks free in ever-shrinking Antarctica

todayonline.com

A huge iceberg breaks free in ever-shrinking Antarctica


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Trillion-tonne iceberg breaks off Antarctica

gulfnews.com

Trillion-tonne iceberg breaks off Antarctica


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4 things you need to know about the iceberg that broke off Antarctica

abc3340.com

4 things you need to know about the iceberg that broke off Antarctica


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Home / Polar / Antarctic / Antarctica
Helicopter pilot David Wood died of hypothermia in Antarctica, inquest hears
It was supposed to be the helicopter pilot's last tour of Antarctica. To earn a good wage to pay for his children's university education, and a happy retirement with his family in Winnipeg, Canada. For Captain David Wood, 62, the remote continent was not about adventure, his wife Mary Macdonald told an inquest into his death on Tuesday in an emotional statement   Read More ...
Places: Australia |  Antarctica | 
Inquest to open after death of helicopter pilot David Wood in Antarctica
Twenty months after Captain David Wood fell into a crevasse on a remote ice shelf in Antarctica, hearings for the inquest into his death will open on Tuesday in the ACT Coroner's Court. The pilot's death was a reminder of the "hostile, remote and inherently dangerous environment" in which Antarctic employees worked, said environment minister Greg Hunt at the time. Now the inquest will scrutinise the circumstances of his death   Read More ...
Places: Australia |  Antarctica | 
Antarctica: can you help us tell the story?
Antarctica: Valued, Protected, Understood – can you help us tell the story? For the past six-decades, the New Zealand Antarctic programme has taken media, artists and educators to Scott Base to tell the story of New Zealand’s role in Antarctica. Is it your turn to help us in that quest? We’ve now opened applications for this once in a lifetime opportunity – to visit Scott Base during the Antarctic summer of 2018/19 as part of our Community Engagement Programme   Read More ...
Places: New Zealand |  Antarctica | 
Antarctic Caves Might Host Mysterious Forms Of Life: What’s Inside These ‘Secret’ Caves?
Antarctica is well-known as a frozen, remote land, but new research suggests that the continent’s caves might be home to some “secret” forms of life. According to Popular Mechanics, a multinational team of scientists spotted a vast network of cave systems around Mount Erebus, an active volcano located on Ross Island. Aside from gathering DNA samples belonging to algae, mosses, and tiny invertebrate animals, the researchers also discovered some peculiar DNA sequences that didn’t match up with any known living creature   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Antarctica's ice caves could be hiding undiscovered species of plants and animals
Secret life may be thriving deep below the icy glaciers surrounding the volcanos in Antarctica within the extensive system of caves, researchers say. A new study led by the Australian National University (ANU) used DNA sequencing techniques to forensically analyse soil from the caves, which revealed traces of DNA from algae, mosses and small animals. Researchers say further investigation could unveil new species of plants and animals not discovered before   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Oceania |  Australasia |  Australia |  Antarctica | 
Burnt down research station in Antarctica to be reborn under BRICS cooperation
A burnt down research station in the Antarctica is expected to be reborn next year thanks to cooperation built by the BRICS bloc, which will enable it to continue generating benefits to the globe, even including the southernmost point on the Earth. Under an international contract, a Chinese enterprise will complete the reconstruction of the seriously damaged research station with rich experience and adept skills within only four months during the summer time in the Antarctica   Read More ...
Categories: Society & Culture | 
Places: Antarctica |  Asia |  E. Asia |  China | 
Icebergs: Mathematical model calculates the collapse of shelf ice
Shelf ice, as found in Antarctica, refers to giant floating ice sheets that can span thousands of square kilometres. Pieces break off at their edges which form icebergs in the ocean. In order to more effectively predict these break-offs, in a process known as calving, a research team has developed mathematical models. On the basis of physical factors, it is claimed that these models can be used to predict when and where the ice may collapse   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Antarctica | 
Sailor Lisa Blair returns to Sydney after record circumnavigation of Antarctica
After more than six months at sea and a record circumnavigation of Antarctica, sailor Lisa Blair will sail through Sydney heads victorious. Ms Blair set off in her yacht Climate Action Now on January 22 determined to become the first woman to sail solo, non-stop and unassisted around Antarctica. But, after 72 days at sea, the mast snapped in rough seas and Ms Blair was forced to motored to a South African port for repairs   Read More ...
Places: Australia |  Antarctica | 
Davis Antarctic base set to end faecal dump into sea with new treatment technology
A new wastewater treatment plant soon to be installed at one of Australia's Antarctic bases will enable the 12-year-old practice of pumping poo and other waste into the ocean to finally come to an end. The $1.5 million "state-of-the-art" technology will "use germ-zapping technologies to process human and kitchen waste into drinkable-quality water that will have minimal impact on the marine environment when it's discharged into the ocean," the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) said   Read More ...
Places: Australia |  Antarctica | 
2.7-million-year-old ice core pulled from Antarctica
A team of researchers from Princeton University, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the University of Maine and Oregon State University has drilled and retrieved a 2.7-million-year-old ice core from a spot in Antarctica. The team presented their findings at this year's Goldschmidt Conference in Paris. Until recently, scientists believed that ice core samples taken from either pole had an age limit of approximately 800,000 years—this was because ice at the bottom melted due to heat from inside the Earth   Read More ...
Categories: Education | 
Places: Antarctica | 
Another Climate-Change Nightmare: 91 New Volcanoes Under Antarctica's Ice
Antarctica has been having a rough time of it lately, you may have heard. You know - greenhouse gases, warming oceans, trillion-ton icebergs breaking off the continent like a middle-aged man losing hair in the sink. Not the best century for the old South Pole. And now it turns out Antarctica has problems we didn't even know about. Deep problems   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Antarctica |  India | 
Would You Dare to Eat This 106-Year Old Fruitcake from Antarctica?
What is the most bizarre thing that youve ever eaten The fruitcake is believed to have a very slight rancid butter smell to it The extreme cold in Antarctica has assisted its preservation What is the most bizarre thing that you've ever eaten? Nothing as weird as the recently discovered 106-year old, untouched fruitcake that is believed to be still edible   Read More ...
Categories: Life & Style |  Travel & Recreation | 
Places: Antarctica |  India | 
Fears dozens of newly-discovered volcanoes below Antarctica could ERUPT triggering mass flooding and global chaos
VOLCANOES hidden beneath Antarctic ice have been discovered by researchers – who think 91 could be active and cause flooding. Surveys carried out by scientists at the University of Edinburgh found a range of active volcanoes underneath thick layers of ice. The range is in a region known as the west Antarctic rift system. It could be the densest region of volcanoes in the world – and there are fears they could erupt at any time, reports the Daily Star   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Antarctica |  Europe |  N.W. Europe |  United Kingdom | 
Another climate-change nightmare: 91 new volcanoes beneath Antarctica’s ice
Antarctica has been having a rough time of it lately, you may have heard. You know — greenhouse gases, warming oceans, trillion-ton icebergs breaking off the continent like a middle-aged man losing hair in the sink. Not the best century for the old South Pole. And now it turns out Antarctica has problems we didn't even know about. Deep problems. Volcanoes-under-the-ice problems, which doesn't sound healthy   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
106-year-old fruit cake found in Antarctica 'looked and smelled edible'
Researchers discovered a 106-year-old, untouched fruit cake in an old explorer hut in Antarctica — and it still looks and smells good enough to eat. "There was a very, very slight rancid butter smell to it, but other than that, the cake looked and smelled edible!" explained Lizzie Meek of Antarctic Heritage Trust. "There is no doubt the extreme cold in Antarctica has assisted its preservation   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Nearly 100 Volcanoes Discovered Beneath Antarctica's Ice
You could say Antarctica sings a song of fire and ice. The continent’s frigid reputation is well known, but researchers from the University of Edinburgh analyzed radar scans of the West Antarctic Rift System and found 138 volcanoes hiding under the thick ice sheet. Of those, 91 were previously unidentified, they say, and the discovery could change our understanding of how the overlaying ice layer grows and shrinks   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Tags: Geology |  Volcanoes |  Earth science |  Volcanology | 
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
SEE PICS: 106-year-old 'almost' edible fruitcake found in Antarctica
A well preserved 100-year-old fruitcake, still wrapped in paper and encased in the remains of a tin, has been found along with other artefacts at Cape Adare in Antarctica. Made by Huntley and Palmers, the cake probably dates to the Cape Adare-based Northern Party of Scott's Terra Nova expedition - which went on from 1910 to 1913 - as it has been documented that Scott took this particular brand of cake with him at that time, said researchers from the Antarctic Heritage Trust in the UK   Read More ...
Places: Antarctica |  India | 
Robert Scott’s 106-Year-Old ‘Almost Edible’ Fruitcake Found In Antarctica
A 106-year-old fruitcake was deemed “almost edible” after it was discovered by conservationist in Antarctica. The century-old dessert, preserved by some of the most frigid temperatures in the world, is believed to have belonged to 20th-century British explorer Robert Falcon Scott and his team. The New Zealand-based Antarctic Heritage Trust, who discovered the frozen delicacy, reported last week that the fruitcake is still wrapped in its original paper packaging and encased in the remains of a “tin-plated iron alloy tin   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Volcanoes Under Antarctica Found By Scientists, Climate Change Could Trigger Eruption
Over 90 volcanoes under Antarctic were recently discovered by scientists. The volcanoes, lurking beneath the ice, have scientists wondering about the potential for an eruption. With the highest over 13,000 feet, the network of volcanoes under Antarctica sits quietly about two miles below the surface. Making up the largest volcanic region on Earth, the 91 previously unknown volcanoes stretch 2,100 miles along the western edge of the continent   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
106-year-old fruitcake found in ‘excellent condition’ in Antarctica
NEW YORK — Consider the fruitcake. Long maligned for its questionable taste, its ubiquity (stubbornly appearing at any or every celebratory event) and its toughness (the fridge gives it life), the dessert may have further cemented itself in food lore after a discovery in Antarctica. In one of the most hostile regions known to humankind, conservationists unearthed an ice-covered fruitcake they believe once belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott, the New Zealand-based Antarctic Heritage Trust said this past week   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Antarctica |  Singapore | 
Antarctica fruitcake is over 100 years old. It's 'almost' edible.
Consider the fruitcake. Long maligned for its questionable taste, its ubiquity (stubbornly appearing at any every celebratory event) and its toughness (the fridge gives it life), the dessert may have further cemented itself in food lore after a discovery in Antarctica. In one of the most hostile regions known to humankind, conservationists unearthed an ice-covered fruitcake they believe once belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott, the New Zealand-based Antarctic Heritage Trust said last week   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Largest volcanic region on Earth discovered under Antarctica
Scientists have uncovered the largest volcanic region on Earth - consisting of almost 100 volcanoes two kilometres below the surface of the vast Antarctic ice sheet. Researchers at Edinburgh University in the UK revealed a staggering 91 volcanoes, adding to the 47 others that had been discovered previously, with the highest as tall as the Eiger, which stands at almost 4,000 metres in Switzerland   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Tags: Geology |  Volcanoes |  Earth science |  Volcanology | 
Places: Antarctica |  India | 
Antarctica fruitcake is over 100 years old, and it's 'almost' edible
LONDON — Consider the fruitcake. Long maligned for its questionable taste (what did Grandma emput/em in this?), its perseverance (stubbornly appearing at any or every celebratory event) and its toughness (the fridge gives it life), the dessert may have cemented itself further in food lore after a discovery in Antarctica. In one of the most hostile regions to humankind, conservationists for the New Zealand-based Antarctic Heritage Trust have unearthed an ice-covered fruitcake they believe once belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Century-old fruitcake found in Antarctica
But a new find by the Antarctic Heritage Trust suggests it's no match for a 106-year-old British fruitcake. Conservators found the elderly cake on Cape Adare, and believe it belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott - known as Scott of the Antarctic. Although the cake's tin was rusted, the team said it was in "excellent condition" and smelled edible. The New Zealand-based Trust found it in Antarctica's oldest building, a hut built by Norwegian explorer Carsten Borchgrevink's team in 1899, and used by Capt Scott in 1911 during his Terra Nova expedition   Read More ...
Places: Tonga |  Antarctica | 
Would you take a bite? Edible 100-year-old fruitcake discovered in Antarctica
The cake, wrapped in paper and stored inside a rusted tin, was found in the Antarctic's oldest building, a hut on Cape Adare. It is believed to have been brought to the Antarctic by British explorer Robert Falcon Scott - pictured standing in the centre with his Antarctic exploration team - during his Terra Nova expedition between 1910 and 1913. The brand of the cake, Huntley & Palmers, was known to be a favourite of Scott, who successfully led his team to the South Pole in 1912 from the base hut   Read More ...
Places: Antarctica |  Ireland | 
A 100-Year-Old Fruitcake Was Found 'Perfectly Preserved' in Antarctica
The Antarctic Heritage Trust has recovered a 100-year-old fruit cake on Cape Adare in Antarctica, where famed explorer Robert Falcon Scott's team was likely based for the . Conservators for the trust said the tin was rusted, but the cake (made by British biscuit company Huntley & Palmers) still looked and smelled edible, Lizzie Meek, the manager of the program's artefacts, said in a statement   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Century-old fruitcake found in Antarctica
Ice-covered Antarctica is one of the earth's most hostile natural environments. But a new find by the Antarctic Heritage Trust suggests it's no match for a 106-year-old British fruitcake. Conservators found the elderly cake on Cape Adare, and believe it belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott - known as Scott of the Antarctic. Although the cake's tin was rusted, the team said it was in "excellent condition" and smelled edible   Read More ...
Places: New Zealand |  Antarctica | 
Antarctica fruitcake: 106-year-old dessert left by Capt Scott
Ice-covered Antarctica is one of the earth's most hostile natural environments. But a new find by the Antarctic Heritage Trust suggests it's no match for a 106-year-old British fruitcake. Conservators found the elderly cake on Cape Adare, and believe it belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott - known as Scott of the Antarctic. Although the cake's tin was rusted, the team said it was in "excellent condition" and smelled edible   Read More ...
Places: Antarctica |  Sri Lanka | 
A 106-year-old fruitcake found in Antarctica still looks ‘like new’
It’s a good thing scientists weren’t especially hungry when they stepped inside one of the earliest structures built in Antarctica recently. On a shelf in a hut in Cape Adare sat a “perfectly preserved” fruitcake apparently untouched for more than a century, reports Stuff.co.nz. Made by British label Huntley & Palmers, the fruitcake was hidden inside a “severely corroded” tin taken from the hut as part of a conservation project encompassing several old huts built during a Norwegian expedition in 1899, per AAP   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica |  Midwest |  West |  Missouri | 
Antarctica fruitcake: 106-year-old dessert 'left by Capt Scott'
Ice-covered Antarctica is one of the earth's most hostile natural environments. But a new find by the Antarctic Heritage Trust suggests it's no match for a 106-year-old British fruitcake. Conservators found the elderly cake on Cape Adare, and believe it belonged to British explorer Robert Falcon Scott - known as Scott of the Antarctic. Although the cake's tin was rusted, the team said it was in "excellent condition" and smelled edible   Read More ...
Places: Antarctica |  United Kingdom | 
A 106-year-old fruitcake found in Antarctica still looks ‘like new’
It’s a good thing scientists weren’t especially hungry when they stepped inside one of the earliest structures built in Antarctica recently. On a shelf in a hut in Cape Adare sat a “perfectly preserved” fruitcake apparently untouched for more than a century, reports Stuff.co.nz. Made by British label Huntley & Palmers, the fruitcake was hidden inside a “severely corroded” tin taken from the hut as part of a conservation project encompassing several old huts built during a Norwegian expedition in 1899, per AAP   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica |  South |  Southcentral US |  Oklahoma | 
100-Year-Old Fruitcake Found In Antarctica Looks Good Enough To Eat
An indestructible fruitcake withstood one of the coldest, driest places on earth for a century to emerge '(almost) edible'. Conservators from the New Zealand-based Antarctic Heritage Trust discovered the 106-years-old treat in a hut on Cape Adare in East Antarctica. According to a statement released by the trust, the cake probably dates back to the Terra Nova expedition of 1910-1913, led by British explorer Robert Falcon Scott   Read More ...
Places: Antarctica |  India | 
After 106 years in Antarctica, fruitcake still looks 'like new'
It's a good thing scientists weren't especially hungry when they stepped inside one of the earliest structures built in Antarctica recently. On a shelf in a hut in Cape Adare sat a "perfectly preserved" fruitcake apparently untouched for more than a century, reports Stuff.co.nz. Made by British label Huntley & Palmers, the fruitcake was hidden inside a "severely corroded" tin taken from the hut as part of a conservation project encompassing several old huts built during a Norwegian expedition in 1899, per AAP   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Not all glaciers in Antarctica have been affected by climate change
A new study by scientists at Portland State University and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder has found that the effects of climate change, which are apparent in other parts of the Antarctic continent, are not yet observed for glaciers in the western Ross Sea coast. Published online ahead of print for the journal Geology, the study found that the pattern of glacier advance and retreat has not changed along the western Ross Sea coast, in contrast to the rapidly shrinking glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: Antarctica | 
Postcards to Antarctica – new exhibition by Guy Frederick
Scott Base staff and scientists share what Antarctica means to them in Postcards to Antarctica, an exhibition by photo-journalist Guy Frederick opening at Canterbury Museum on 11 August. Accompanied by photographs and film, the exhibition transports the visitor to day-to-day life at Scott Base and celebrates Antarctica’s significance to science and humanity.“Writing a postcard TO Antarctica may not be as strange as it seems,” says Guy   Read More ...
Categories: Entertainment & Arts |  Society & Culture | 
Places: Oceania |  Australasia |  Zealandia |  New Zealand |  Antarctica | 
What's next for the massive ice chunk that broke off Antarctica?
Last month, a Delaware-sized iceberg broke off the Larsen Ice Shelf in Antarctica. The 2,240-square-mile ice shelf completely separated from Antarctica between July 10 and 12, causing widespread alarm around the world. While many took to social media to express concern about the separation of the Larsen C iceberg and the impacts of climate change, experts said that cracks in ice shelves are part of their natural cycle   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Michio Kaku And Others Theorize: Why Did A Trillion Ton Ice Shelf Break Off Antarctica? [Video] [Opinion]
Michio Kaku and many other scientists are speculating on why the trillion ton, 2,500-square mile Larson ice shelf C broke off Antarctica and is floating away. The Antarctic Larson ice shelves A and B have already broken off, going to a similar fate. Michio Kaku blames global warming and climate change. That is a popular theory. Related to Michio Kaku’s thought, Australian scientists are blaming strengthening westward winds, according to NDTV   Read More ...
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
In A Stunning First, Couple Marries In Antarctica In Sub-Zero Temperatures
London: In a first, a couple got married in the British Antarctic Territory, with the bride sewing an orange piece of tent on to her dress for her "something old." Polar field guides Julie Baum and Tom Sylvester got married in sub-zero temperatures in a two-day celebration. The wedding guests included the couple's 18 colleagues who live and work at the British Antarctic Survey's (BAS) largest research station during the winter months   Read More ...
Categories: Life & Style | 
Places: Antarctica |  India | 
New satellite images show massive Antarctica iceberg slowly drifting out to sea
One of the largest icebergs ever recorded broke free in Antarctica, and scientists are saying another collapse might have catastrophic consequences. Veuer's Elizabeth Keatinge has the full story. The sea cruise is underway. The massive iceberg that calved off Antarctica last week is slowly drifting into the Weddell Sea. Satellite images show the widening gap between the 1-trillion-ton berg — known as A-68 — and the Larsen C ice shelf   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  Antarctica | 
Massive Antarctica iceberg slowly drifting out to sea
One of the largest icebergs ever recorded broke free in Antarctica, and scientists are saying another collapse might have catastrophic consequences. Veuer's Elizabeth Keatinge has the full story. The sea cruise is underway. The massive iceberg that calved off Antarctica last week is slowly drifting into the Weddell Sea. Satellite images show the widening gap between the 1-trillion-ton berg — known as A-68 — and the Larsen C ice shelf   Read More ...
Categories: Science & Nature | 
Places: United States |  Antarctica |